rabbit breeds

10 Best Meat Rabbit Breeds for Homesteads

Rabbits, as cute as they look, they can even taste better when eaten! Rabbit meats is very commonly consumed all over the world and is used in making different delicious dishes which might include soups, stews, barbecue and roasting of the meat. You may find many Rabbit breeds for meat which is not only suitable for consumption of adults but also for kids. Rabbits are one of those animals or pets which can be easily raised and their maintenance and other expenses are very economical. You can build Rabbit hutch by looking at different Rabbit hutches plans on the internet, and the items needed are usually those which are available at home or can be purchased at a low cost rather than purchasing a commercial hutch which is comparatively expensive. The feeding of the Rabbits is not expensive either and so you can easily raise them for food or just having them as pets, however remember that not all Rabbit breeds are suitable for eating but only a few types of meat Rabbits.

The Rabbit meat falls in the category of white meat and is safe for consumption by people who are suffering from different diseases and also for those people who are on a strict diet and are cutting down fats in their diet. Rabbit is one of the best white meat which is available in the market and has many benefits. They have digestible protein which is low on fat; in fact they are almost fat less. Since there is no fat, the meat of Rabbit contains low calories and is cholesterol free making it highly recommended for cardiac patients, those who have cholesterol problems and those who are on a diet and want to lose weight. Another benefit of Rabbit meat is that they comparatively have lower sodium content which makes them safe for consumption by those people who have blood pressure problem due to sodium intolerance. Rabbit meat also have a good amount of phosphorus and calcium, it helps in normalizing the metabolism and is also highly recommended for cancer patients going under radiation therapy because it lowers the dose. If you are suffering from atherosclerosis, eating Rabbit meat on a regular basis can actually prevent it.

People slaughter the Rabbits, the skin and the meat goes for consumption whereas the fur goes for making of different items. Unlike other animals, inbreeding can occur in the Rabbits and there is no harm in it, they won’t be prone top diseases or have deformation in their offspring. Raising Rabbits for food can be a good and money making activity. If you are thinking about raising them, then here are 10 best meat Rabbit breeds list:

  1) New Zealand Whites:

This is one of the most common rabbit breed used for meat and tops the best rabbit meat in the USA, you may find a variety of signature dishes from this breed’s ,eat. The meat can weigh 9 to 12 pounds.

New Zealand Whites  2) Californian Rabbits:

These were developed by crossing of Chinchilla and New Zealand Whites. They have white fur with black spots and are known for their blocky and good production of meat. They can weigh around 8 to 12 pounds.

Californian

     

  3) The American Chinchilla:

This is one of the best Rabbits for meat and looks very much like a Chinchilla however is larger in size. They have a stocky body and the meat may weigh up to 9 pounds. The deep lion are preferred best for roasting and barbeque.

The American Chinchilla

       4) Silver Foxes:

These are great homestead rabbit and also fall in the fancy category and for producing meat. These breed are also very rare and may weigh 10 to 12 pounds. As the name suggest, they have silver body with black shading, just like a silver fox.

Silver Foxes

       5) Champagne D Argent:

This historic yet attractive Rabbit has been used for meat since 1631. Their meat is loved all over the world and is perfect for homestead. They are available in white, creme and chocolate colors.

Champagne D Argent

       6) Cinnamons Rabbits:

This is a cross bred between the New Zealand White and American Chinchilla. Having the physical appearance and sturdy body of both of the breeds, this Rabbit breed produces a good quantity of meat and are bred commercially for meat.

Cinnamons

        7) Satins rabbits:

These are large and heavy breeds which are considered for producing a good amount of meat. These are also prefect raising Rabbits for meat as homestead. These medium large sized Rabbits are available in blue, black, copper, chocolate, red, Siamese and otter colors.

Satins rabbits

        8) Rex Rabbits:

These soft and plush Rabbits were developed for the purpose of fur and meat. When mature, they may weigh around 8 to 10 pounds and may come in a variety of blue, amber and spotted patterns ion their color. The Rex can make some good meat and is perfect for homestead.

Rex Rabbits

     9) Palomino Rabbits:

These are good meat rabbit for homestead and are also bred commercially for meat purpose. They have a good temper and so can be great homestead and may weigh 8 to 11 pounds.

Palomino Rabbits

10) Flemish Giants:

As the name suggests, these Rabbits are giant in their size and may above 20 pounds. They have a large body with broad skeleton structure and according to this size they also eat more. This breed can also be best for homestead.

Flemish Giants

14 Responses

  1. alfredo walker
    alfredo walker at |

    It is illegal to possess rabbits in the state of Queensland, in Australia.
    The fine is $10,000 from memory.

    Reply
  2. alfredo walker
    alfredo walker at |

    Just did a Google search….
    The fine now stsnds at $44,000.

    Reply
  3. Dr. Abdul Azeez Sheikh.
    Dr. Abdul Azeez Sheikh. at |

    Please furnish availability addresses cost etc. to promote them.

    Reply
  4. Linda Buckingham
    Linda Buckingham at |

    As a breeder of meat rabbits for over 10 years, I prefer Palominos. They have the best temperament, especially with children, and they are a much hardier rabbit than Californians and New Zealands. If you live in an area where heat is an issue, I would strongly suggest Palominos. They are able to handle the heat much better than most breeds than my other breeds.

    Reply
    1. Debra
      Debra at |

      I live where it is cold in winter are these a good rabbit for cold too.

      Reply
  5. Mikki Baird
    Mikki Baird at |

    I live in the Indiana, and the Southeast Ohio area. What breeds are best for keeping in colder temps, in winter? I am thinking of breeding for our homestead.

    Reply
  6. Kate
    Kate at |

    Purebred Flemish Giants do not make good meat rabbits. The Flemish is bred to have a large strong bone structure rather than a large meat mass. They are bred for balance, not meat. They mature slowly, often taking 1 to 1-1/2 years before they are fully grown and few get larger than 18lbs. However, a Flemish crossed with a meat breed often produces wonderful meat rabbits. Popular choices are Flemish/Californian and Flemish/New Zealand. These cross breeds tend to grow quickly into large fryers with plenty of meat, making a Flemish-Cross the perfect homesteader’s meat rabbit.

    Reply
  7. Tonya
    Tonya at |

    We are just starting to raise rabbits in the mid michigan area, we are looking for a stock to start out with so please email us if you could if you are local so we can purchase a couple. Looking for 1 buck and 2 does to start with. Have a large 5 pen hutch
    perefalcon@hotmail.com

    Reply
  8. Stephen Downs
    Stephen Downs at |

    I had a hard time finding cost analyst information on raising rabbits for meat when I first started. I want to share with the community what I use to calculate cost and give the community what my costs are. I raise my rabbits to 12 weeks over 8 or 10 weeks before slaughter. I do this because it lowered the cost per pound for meat. If you want a copy of the excel spreadsheet I created or have questions, you can email me at stephen.wayne.downs@gmail.com.

    Main formula’s
    (((365/2)*2)/50)*16 cost of food a year for male
    (((365/3)*2)/50)*16 cost of food a year for female
    ((((42/1)*3)/50)*16)+((((14/1)*4)/50)*16) cost of food per litter for fryer’s to reach 12 weeks 8 in a litter
    Formula breakdown
    365 is days in a year
    the /# is how many days to go through feed
    the *# is pounds of feed gone through in /# days
    the /50 is for 50lbs or food bags of pellets
    the *16 is price of pellets
    the litter cost is longer due to the increase in feed consumed in the last 2 weeks before slaughter

    Northern Kentucky feed costs
    0.125 Cost of Alfalfa per pound
    0.32 Cost of Mana Pro per pound
    Alfalfa is about 60% cheaper than Mana Pro pellets

    Below is output data from my cost analyst if I eat all I produce

    fpy stands for feed per year
    I raise my rabbits to 12 weeks before slaughter and that is why I have a higher hanging weight

    Pellet feed
    Flemish/New Zealand
    males females litters
    1 3 12
    $116.80 $77.87 $58.24 Cost fpy
    $116.80 $233.60 $698.88 $1,049.28
    Meat produced
    96 Fryers produced a year
    3.5 Average Hanging weight
    336 Total meat produced
    $3.12 Cost per pound of meat

    Hay feed
    Flemish/New Zealand
    males females litters
    1 3 12
    $116.80 $77.87 $58.24 Cost fpy
    $116.80 $233.60 $698.88 $419.71
    Meat produced
    96 Fryers produced a year
    3.5 Average Hanging weight
    336 Total meat produced
    $1.25 Cost per pound of meat

    Below is output data from my cost analyst if I eat 60% and sell 40%

    fpy stands for feed per year
    I raise my rabbits to 12 weeks before slaughter and that is why I have a higher hanging weight
    Rabbit sale price is based on my area selling as meat rabbits

    Pellet feed
    Flemish Giant
    males females litters
    1 3 12
    $116.80 $77.87 $58.24 Cost fpy
    $116.80 $233.60 $698.88 $1,049.28
    Meat produced
    96 Fryers produced a year
    57.6 Fryers to eat 60%
    38.4 Fryers to sell 40%
    960 income from sale $25 each
    5 Average Hanging weight
    288 Total meat produced
    $3.64 Cost per pound of meat
    $0.31 Cost per pound offset by sales
    $-89.28 net loss

    Hay feed
    Flemish Giant
    males females litters
    1 3 12
    $116.80 $77.87 $58.24 Cost fpy
    $116.80 $233.60 $698.88 $419.71
    Meat produced
    96 Fryers produced a year
    57.6 Fryers to eat 60%
    38.4 Fryers to sell 40%
    960 income from sale $25 each
    5 Average Hanging weight
    288 Total meat produced
    $1.46 Cost per pound of meat
    $- Cost per pound offset by sales
    $540.29 net income

    Pellet feed
    New Zealand
    males females litters
    1 3 12
    $116.80 $77.87 $58.24 Cost fpy
    $116.80 $233.60 $698.88 $1,049.28
    Meat produced
    96 Fryers produced a year
    57.6 Fryers to eat 60%
    38.4 Fryers to sell 40%
    576 income from sale $15 each
    3.5 Average Hanging weight
    201.6 Total meat produced
    $5.20 Cost per pound of meat
    $2.35 Cost per pound offset by sales
    $-473.28 net loss

    Hay feed
    New Zealand
    males females litters
    1 3 12
    $116.80 $77.87 $58.24 Cost fpy
    $116.80 $233.60 $698.88 $419.71
    Meat produced
    96 Fryers produced a year
    57.6 Fryers to eat 60%
    38.4 Fryers to sell 40%
    576 income from sale $15 each
    3.5 Average Hanging weight
    201.6 Total meat produced
    $2.08 Cost per pound of meat
    $- Cost per pound offset by sales
    $156.29 net income

    I hope you find this information useful.

    Reply
    1. brian
      brian at |

      Awsome
      Thanks folks

      Reply
    2. Susan Shafer
      Susan Shafer at |

      When you say you sell 40% of the rabbits at $25 each, are you talking about live rabbits or are you getting $5 a pound for rabbit meat?

      Reply
    3. Scott
      Scott at |

      Something you should consider as well is the pelts. If you aren’t planning to use them for your own projects, you can sell them online for others to use. Also, the rear feet of the rabbit can be preserved and sold as real “lucky” rabbit foot. You might also look for a Falconry group in your area, I know in my area, they are willing to just buy the rabbit heads.

      With a little extra work, you can make 7 to 10 dollars per processed rabbit as well.

      Reply

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